Travelling Abroad – Weird Border Crossings

When travelling abroad there are many strange and unusual things you can come across. Different experiences, cultures and ways of life. Travelling is a great way to broaden your horizons and gain experiences you wouldn’t at home. When traveling abroad it’s important that you have correct documentation. Many countries require correct visas, these are normally free but some countries do charge an entry fee. However one thing your cant prepare for is the weirdest border crossings.

Looking at travelling abroad, IXPVisas looked into border crossings around the world to see which ones are the weirdest. There were a number of surprising results, with many people not realising that these crossings even exist. They found that:

Crossing from Costa Rica to Panama means crossing the border at Paso Canoas through a shopping arcade, perfect if you want to get some shopping on your travels. Not surprising the crossing between Kyrgyzstan to China isn’t particularly well placed. You have to pass through a standalone gateway at the 3,900m high Torugart pass. You get fantastic views but do have to sit in long queues behind heavy goods vehicles.

Closer to home in Europe, the border between the Netherlands and Belgium cuts one town in half. Baarle-Nassau has white lines differentiating between Dutch and Belgian territory. The plus side of this crossing means that when the drinking laws in one side the town stops drinking, all you have to do is go to the other half! Also a border crossing is also marked underground in a salt mine. The Austria to Germany border is marked underground in the Bad Dürrnberg salt mine.

Considering the size of the US Canada border it’s no surprise that they have some unusual border crossings. One American township can only be accessed over water through Canada. Northwest Angle, which is technically part of Minnesota is tricky to get to, you have to leave the US to get to it, back in the US, confusing.

 

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